Vaccine Reactions in Pets

Vaccine Reactions in Pets

After receiving a vaccine, it is normal for pets to experience certain side effects which usually start within hours after the vaccination. It’s important to note that if the below side effects last for more than a day or two, or if your pet is in visible discomfort, then you need to contact your veterinarian immediately.

These side effects include:

• Mild fever
• Decreased appetite and activity
• Discomfort and local swelling at the vaccination site
• For intranasal vaccines, pets may experience sneezing, mild coughing, runny nose or other respiratory signs, which may occur 2–5 days after the vaccine

More severe but less common side effects (including allergic reactions) can also occur as soon as minutes or hours after a vaccination. These reactions are medical emergencies and can be life-threatening. If you notice any of these signs, seek veterinary care immediately:

• Persistent diarrhea or vomiting
• Itchy, bumpy skin or hives
• Swelling around the face, neck, eyes and muzzle
• Difficulty breathing or severe coughing
• Collapse

You may also notice a small, firm swelling under the skin where the vaccine was administered. This should begin to disappear within a couple weeks—if it persists more than three weeks, or if it gets bigger, please contact your veterinarian.

Questions?

At PAVG, we are always committed to making sure your pet stays happy and healthy. If you suspect your pet may be experiencing a reaction to a vaccine, or if you notice any of the above symptoms, please contact us at our following locations:

Chillicothe: 309-273-1909
Dunlap: 309-439-9522
Dunlap II: 309-413-0527

Cherry Eye in Pets

A prolapsed gland of the eyelid (or, “cherry eye”) refers to a pink mass that protrudes from an animal’s eyelid. Usually, the gland development is anchored by an attachment that is made up of fibrous material. This condition occurs in both cats and dogs—however it mostly affects younger pets.

How Can I Identify Cherry Eye in Pets?

The most common sign of cherry eye is an oval mass that protrudes from your pet’s third eyelid. This can occur in both eyes or just one eye and can be accompanied by irritation and swelling.

What Causes Cherry Eye?

This condition is often associated with a congenital weakness of the gland’s attachment to the pet’s eye. It is unknown however, if this condition is inherited. For cats, cherry eye can happen to any breed, however it is more commonly seen in Burmese or Persian cats.

How is Cherry Eye Diagnosed?

Your veterinarian will review the mass in your pet’s third eyelid to see if there are any underlying causes for the condition. The diagnosis for the prolapsed gland could be everted or scrolled cartilage in the third eyelid, a prolapse of fat in the pet’s eye or abnormal cells in the third eye.

What is the Treatment for Cherry Eye?

A treatment option for cherry eye includes a surgical replacement of the gland in the pet’s eye, or even removing the entire gland if the condition is that severe. If medications are recommended, they are typically topical, anti-inflammatory treatments that are effective in reducing swelling.

Questions?

At PAVG, we are always committed to making sure your pet stays happy and healthy. If you suspect your pet may be suffering from cherry eye, or if you notice any of the above symptoms, please contact us at our following locations:

Chillicothe: 309-273-1909
Dunlap: 309-439-9522
Dunlap II: 309-413-0527

Ear Infections in Pets

Otitis interna refers to an inflammation of a pet’s inner ear, while otitis media refers to an inflammation of a pet’s middle ear—both of these conditions are caused by bacterial infection.

For dogs, long-eared breeds with excessive hair and non-erect outer ears are believed to be more susceptible to canine ear infections. These breeds include Cocker Spaniels, Labrador Retrievers and Springer Spaniels.

What Are the Symptoms of Ear Infections in Pets?

Symptoms of otitis media or interna heavily depend on how extensive and severe the infection is. Signs may include no visible symptoms whatsoever, to apparent nervous system involvement. When symptoms do appear, they may include:

• Pain when a pet opens their mouth
• Hesitancy in chewing
• Shaking their head
• Pawing at their affected ear
• Tilting their head
• Leaning to the side of their affected ear
• Altered sense of balance

If both of your pet’s ears are affected by inflammation, additional symptoms may include wobbly uncoordinated body movement, deafness and wide-swinging movements of the head.

Additional symptoms may include:

• Vomiting
• Nausea
• Redness of the ears
• Unequally sized pupils
• Ear discharge
• Gray bulging eardrum
• Nervous system damage including facial nerve damage (for severe cases)

What Are the Causes of Ear Infections in Pets?

Primary causes of ear infections are bacteria—other possible disease-causing agents include yeasts, fungi and ear mites, which increase the likelihood of bacterial infection. Additional causes include bodily trauma, tumors or polyps in the ear or the presence of foreign bodies in the ear.

How Are Ear Infections in Pets Treated?

Severe and debilitating ear infections may cause your pet to be kept in the hospital for treatment. They will also need to be assessed for possible neurologic symptoms. For stable patients, they can be treated at home, usually with medications.

Most bacterial infections will resolve with early aggressive antibiotic therapy, and they will not recur. If there are recurrent ear infections however, surgical drainage may be necessary.

How Can Ear Infections in Pets Be Prevented?

To reduce the changes of infection, routine ear cleaning is recommended. Please note: frequent and overly vigorous ear washes may be damaging to the ear canal.

Questions?

At PAVG, we are always committed to making sure your pet stays happy and healthy. If you suspect your pet may be suffering from an ear infection, or if you notice any of the above symptoms, please contact us at our following locations:

Chillicothe: 309-273-1909
Dunlap: 309-439-9522
Dunlap II: 309-413-0527

Demodectic Mange in Dogs

Caused by the Demodex mite, mange is an inflammatory disease that affects dogs. These mites inhabit the skin and hair follicles of a dog, and when they increase in number, this can lead to skin infections, skin lesions and hair loss. The severity of these symptoms depends on the type of mite that inhabits the dog.

What Are the Symptoms of Demodectic Mange in Dogs?

Demodectic mange in dogs can either affect the entire canine’s body (generalized) or just one specific area of the dog’s body (localized). For localized instances, lesions will occur in patches that usually appear on the torso, legs or face. For generalized instances, symptoms will appear across the body and include hair loss (alopecia), skin redness and the appearance of lesions and scales.

What Are the Causes of Demodectic Mange?

Demodex mites are normal inhabitants of a dog’s skin. When these mites are low in count, they cause no symptoms and can even serve an important role as part of your canine’s normal skin microfauna.

There are three species of mites that cause mange in dogs—the type that is mostly associated with mites is called the Demodex canis, which inhabits the skin and hair follicles and can even be transferred from mother to newborn during nursing.

Almost all dogs carry these mites, however very few suffer symptoms. But when a dog has a compromised immune system, these mites can then begin to multiply unchecked, which will lead to demodectic mange and itchy skin.

How is Demodectic Mange Diagnosed?

To diagnose demodicosis in dogs, skin scrapings will be utilized—plucking hairs can also help identify the mite that is responsible for the condition. Other ways of diagnosing include bacterial infection in the hair follicle, other types of mange and autoimmune disease of the dog’s skin or other metabolic diseases that can affect the skin.

How is Demodectic Mange Treated?

For localized instances, 90 percent of the time this problem will resolve itself and will disappear spontaneously. In severe generalized cases, long-term medications may be required to control this condition.

Female dogs should be spayed, as fluctuations in their hormones may aggravate this disease. To help reduce future instances, a low-stress home environment and high-quality dog food is recommended.

An available treatment option includes isooxazoline flea and tick medicine. Depending on the brand you chose, the frequency of dosage will fluctuate, but typically one chewable tablet every 2–6 weeks will be necessary.

IMPORTANT: Some outlets may mention using motor oil to treat mange but AVOID THIS as it is highly toxic to dogs and should never be applied to their skin or fed to them.

Questions?

At PAVG, we are always committed to making sure your pet stays happy and healthy. If you suspect your pet may be suffering from demodectic mange, or if you notice any of the above symptoms, please contact us at our following locations:

Chillicothe: 309-273-1909
Dunlap: 309-439-9522
Dunlap II: 309-413-0527

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